American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc <p><em>American Studies in Scandinavia</em>, the journal of the Nordic Association for American Studies since 1968, is published twice each year, and carries scholarly articles and reviews on a wide range of American Studies topics and disciplines</p> en-US janne.lahti@helsinki.fi (Janne Lahti) ojs.lib@cbs.dk (Claus Rosenkrantz hansen) Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.1.2.1 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Editor's Note https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5787 Janne Lahti Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5787 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Race War Flares Up: Chicago’s Swedish Press, the Great Migration, and the 1919 Riots https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5788 This study of the three large Swedish-language weeklies in Chicago examines how they covered the city’s African-American community during the latter half of the 1910s, a time when blacks migrated to the North in huge numbers. In Chicago, the result was that the African-American population almost tripled between 1910 and 1920. Little of that was visible in the columns of the weeklies, however, with only a handful of items telling readers that blacks were arriving in record numbers. What news there was about African-Americans, moreover, tended to portray them as criminals. Consequently, the riots that shook Chicago in late July 1919 seemed to take the editors of the weeklies by surprise. A major explanation for the Swedish weeklies’ coverage was that they relied almost exclusively on the city’s English-language dailies for news that did not concern their own ethnic group and thus mirrored the negative way the dailies portrayed African-Americans. Ulf Jonas Björk Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5788 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 “Awakening the Racial Spirit”: Indians, Sámi, and the Politics of Ethnographic Representation, 1930s–1940s https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5789 The article focuses on the efforts by scholars and activists in the 1930s–1940s to reinvigorate discussions of cultural preservation for indigenous peoples at the transnational level. It focuses in particular on the correspondence between, and overlap in, the efforts of ethnographers in the United States and Finland to secure homelands for the indigenous Sámi and American Indians as the cornerstone of cultural preservation efforts. The title, “awakening the racial spirit,” a term used by U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs John Collier (1934–1945), highlights the extent to which ethnographic representations of the time built on racialized and stereotyped images from the past to project onto indigenous peoples a distinctive future. Increasingly, both Sámi and American Indians engaged with and disrupted such representations. The impacts of the efforts to document and demarcate a distinctive indigenous past continue to underpin and inform indigenous rights discussions to this day. Erik Hieta Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5789 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Rupturing Salem, Reconsidering Subjectivity: Tituba, the Witch of Infinity in Maryse Condé’s <i>I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5790 The Salem witch-hunt, invoking the “red hunt” analogy of the McCarthy era, has been a persistent metaphor for persecution, a symbol of fanatic excess in policing the community boundaries. In American cultural history, however, Salem is regarded American only insofar as it proves un-American—as an exception to American exceptionalism. In particular, Tituba, the only non-white “witch” of the trials to whom the unleashing of the hysteria itself has often been attributed, embodies what is negated in Salem against which Americanness is to be affirmed. Maryse Condé’s 1986 novel, I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem recuperates Tituba from this darkness not only to reconfigure American identity but ultimately to reconsider human subjectivity. In Condé’s Salem, New England Puritanism showcases the primal scene of American identity formation, in which the personal, national, and religious subjectivities are fused to form the American self as the autonomous self-possessed individual. Tituba, in contrast, exemplifies an alternative subjectivity as an embodied being constituted in relation to others. Similar to Emmanuel Levinas’s ethical subject, Condé’s Tituba highlights the primacy of the other in the formation of the human subject, ultimately rupturing the totality of history with a counter-history of silenced voices or the infinity of the other. Junghyun Hwang Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5790 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 <i>The Wire</i> and the Disenchantment of the Outsider https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5791 This article is a contextualist reading of the television serial The Wire (2002-2008). Drawing on Grace Hale’s A Nation of Outsiders (2011), this article examines the tension between how the paratexts of The Wire embrace an outsider rhetoric while the serial itself tries to dero-manticize the trope of the outsider. The article argues that the producers of the serial embrace an outsider rhetoric in an effort to gain legitimacy for themselves which is at odds with how the serial debunks the charisma of the outsider. This deromanticization of the outsider is an important part of the serial’s politics as this is a part of The Wire’s “sociological gaze.” The Wire is shown not to accept the notion of a free space beyond the restrictions of contemporary society that the romance of the outsider depends on. Mikkel Jensen Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5791 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 The Chinese Junk <i>Keying</i> and American Racialization of Chinese https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5792 As the first Chinese wooden boat that ever reached the United States, the Keying, with its 40 Chinese sailors who composed the hitherto largest group of Chinese in America, not only satisfied Americans’ curiosity at Chinese junks and Chinese people, but prompted a nationwide attempt at racializing Chinese from 1847 to 1848. This prototypical Chinese racialization features a configuration in which Chinese were triangulated vis-a-vis American whites and nonwhites. Whites occupied the upper corner of the triangle, commanding discursive tools of mass publications to position Chinese relative to whites themselves and other minority groups on America’s racial ladder. Chinese were defined as an inferior, pitiable racial other that resembled Indians in appearance and stood somewhere in between Mexicans and blacks in terms of racial advancement. The triangular paradigm continued to function in American racialization of Chinese even after the departure of the Keying for Britain in February 1848, though with noticeable modifications. Tao Zhang Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5792 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Contributors https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5793 American Studies in Scandinavia Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5793 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera's <i>After American Studies: Rethinking the Legacies of Transnational Exceptionalism</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5794 Jena Habegger-Conti Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5794 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Rani-Henrik Andersson's <i>A Whirlwind Passed Through Our Country: Lakota Voices of the Ghost Dance</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5795 Tiffany Hale Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5795 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Peter Kivisto's <i>The Trump Phenomenon: How Politics of Populism Won in 2016</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5796 Hilmar Mjelde Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5796 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Michel S. Beaulieu, David K. Ratz and Ronald N. Harpelle's (eds.) <i>Hard Work Conquers All: Building the Finnish Community in Canada</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5797 Roman Kushnir Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5797 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Adam Hjorthén's <i>Cross-border Commemorations: Celebrating Swedish Settlement in America</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5798 Roger L. Nichols Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5798 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Miroslava Chávez-García's <i>Migrant Longing. Letter Writing Across the U.S. – Mexico Borderlands</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5799 Jadwiga Maszewska Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5799 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000 Jeffrey C. Stewart's <i>The New Negro. The Life of Alain Locke</i> https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5800 David Östlund Copyright (c) 2019 American Studies in Scandinavia https://rauli.cbs.dk/index.php/assc/article/view/5800 Sat, 02 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0000